Bitcoin’s Magic Is Fading, And That’s A Good Thing

r/Bitcoin recap - May 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 29th monthly Bitcoin news recap. (sorry a bit late this month)
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in May 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Research
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why we shouldn't be asking for regulation and why we need the RIGHT to make bad investments.

I have deleted some of my old accounts but I have been frequenting bitcoin since 2014 and I am rather disappointed with the change over the last year and calls for regulation of crypto. So I thought I should make a reasoned argument as to why regulation is a terrible idea.

1. There aren't THAT many scams

4 out of 5 startups fail crypto or not. Failing is does not equate to scam. Further more sometimes the difference between a scam, just a poorly run startup, slimely business, and a bad idea isn't so clear. I'd guesstimate that at least 95% of crypto projects actually are acting in good faith.

2. Fraudsters don't follow laws anyways

Scammers are often already breaking laws, if they promise they will do X, Y, and Z and they don't they have already broken a contract and are liable to civil suits, and yes even just a promise in a whitepaper can already be considered a contract! Even emails can be considered to be legally binding between two parties in most countries and most freelancers already know this.
If a fraudster is going to really scam people they will be one of those projects with an anonymous team or a fake one. And guess what since the government can't stop people from making crypto transactions a scammer from Russia is still going to be taking your ETH regardless of the regulation because they are anonymous!

3. Regulation favors the rich

In America you often have to be an accredited investor to invest in early startups. In other words to invest in a young company that is having an ICO, if the same rules applied to crypto, you would have to be accredited. So what is an accredited investor?
To be an accredited investor, a person must demonstrate an annual income of $200,000, or $300,000 for joint income, for the last two years with expectation of earning the same or higher income. An individual must have earned income above the thresholds either alone or with a spouse over the last three years. The income test cannot be satisfied by showing one year of an individual's income and the next two years of joint income with a spouse. The exception to this rule is when a person is married within the period of conducting a test. A person is also considered an accredited investor if he has a net worth exceeding $1 million, either individually or jointly with his spouse. The SEC also considers a person to be an accredited investor if he is a general partner, executive officer, director or a related combination thereof for the issuer of unregistered securities.
source
This means you basically have to be a millionaire to invest in early stages of a startup. So that means 99% of people in this subbreddit could no longer participate in ICOs if the same rules applied.
Furthermore the people that will be writing these regulations are going to tend to be older people who have more traditional and conservative investments, so why would someone who is invested in say paypal, want to make it easy for their investment to be made irrelevant? They have disincentive to create good and fair regulations. They lack what Nassim Taleb calls "Skin in The Game" which leads to poor or selfish decisions.

4. No one seems to actually know what "regulation" means

I see people commenting about how they don't like project A and that its a "scam". Truthfully I feel this is often because sometimes it isn't always the best technology or startup that is the best investment so people can get butt hurt over it when they see projects they don't like become successful and then they say "oh I wish there was regulation so this wouldn't become popular." What the fuck are you guys talking about? How do regulate whether or not a shitty technology is favored by people over a good one? Do you really think the government should be deciding what is "good" or "bad" technology? Because if they did Bitcoin would have never been invented in the first place.
Also "regulation" isn't some magic thing that will stop bad things or even scams. Because of the nature of decentralization people can very easily be anonymous and setup ICOs.

5. Regulation will be ineffective and will cause brain drain

Like it or not tax/regulation havens will always exist. So companies will tend to move to places with the least regulation, Binance is a good example of that. And since crypto transactions are trustless the actual company can be in Malta even if the token or coin is used primarily in somewhere like the US. Which means that these crypto companies will still be able to reap the benefits without any of the cost of physically being in some country. That's a lot of tax revenue that will be lost because of regulation.
This also creates more inequality as it means most of the worlds wealth will end up be more concentrated in tax havens. Not to mention anonymous scammers don't follow regulations anyways.

6. You are telling the government you are too stupid to handle your own money

Why on earth should you or the government or anyone tell me I can't throw $1000 bucks at some startup on the other side of the world? Regulation is only going to add more red tap for small startups, I have some experience with this personally as I work for two blockchain startups.
One of these startups I suggested they add an equity function to their utility token, turning it into stock + utility token, as I think that is way more valuable to investors and they will likely be able to raise more money in their ICO. However they have determined that the paperwork alone costs way too much time and money. So these regulations are already hurting both investors and startups. Regulation KILLS innovation.
You can't get 1000x return on one investment without taking a 95% loss on 10, in the end it is still worth it and you still win but regulations will make it damn near impossible for regular people to invest in projects in their early stages or from new better startups being created, so you will only be "protected" from insane profits with maybe a slight improvement in your losses.
More regulation means less profit, and lets be real, most of you are here and want "regulation" because you want more money but this is the worst way to go about it.
If you are too stupid to do basic research and to have diversified your portfolio then you are bad at investing and you shouldn't be playing this game, no amount of regulation will make you a better decision maker. We need the right to make bad investments that fail because that's how investing is done, you tend to make a loss on most investments but the few that profit more than make up for the sum of losses. Just think of the potential of millions of world changing startups that will never be because of red tape.
It's like taxing people because they are dumb.

The Solution: Lawsuits

You can still sue people for things that are not explicitly breaking a law, but breaking a contract. The only regulation should be a business license so the government knows who they are, after that its not harm no foul rule. That means that if ICOs or cryptos try to trick people that they can be taken to court and sued to hell so they still are culpable for wrong doing without hindering young startups.
Stricter regulations would have made a lot more sense in a pre-internet and pre-crypto world. This is because only people who could make researching and educating themselves a full time job could really understand if a business had a reasonable proposition and model since researching anything pre-internet was way more difficult. However with the democratization of information with the internet and of value with crypto these regulations don't make as much sense because the informational asymmetry has almost entirely disappeared between accredited investors and regular motivated people. The only difference now is the size of the wallet, this is a terrible world to live in where only rich have the options.
I highly recommend everyone in crypto read Nassim Talebs "Incerto" collection particularly his latest book "Skin in The Game".
submitted by cryptonewsguy to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Maybe?

Even the most enthusiastic HODLERS can't deny: we're in a bear market. Is it coincidental that exchanges are now (en masse it seems) locking people out of their accounts and making the withdrawl process as difficult as possible? This certainly wasn't an issue when Bitcoin was in a bull market. The Bitconnect Ponzi collapse was entirely predictable because they were essentially advertising it as a ponzi scheme. Do you think that some of these exchanges (bitfinex, binance, bittrex) are acting as fractiononal reserve under our noses? Bernie Madhoff stole billions in a highly regulated environment, right to the end he was keeping it up. Here we have an unregulated environment with magical internet money and criminals like McAfee acting as spokesmen. Yes - watch Tether. It's a scam. I think you should also watch Z-cash (which is up 5% today) and other anonymous coins - my gut feeling is that some of these exchanges are going to be doing some discreet liquidation before getting conveniently "hacked".
submitted by Roofus88 to Tether [link] [comments]

FBAR & FATCA Filing Information for Crypto Traders (Podcast & Summary)

Hey all - we've noticed a ton of our customers asking about FBAR & FATCA filing requirements. So, I interviewed a tax professional well-versed in FBAR & FATCA reporting requirements for crypto traders. Below is a link to the actual podcast, and then a summary of the interview, with timestamps in case you want to just fast forward to a certain part. Full disclosure, I work for Bitcointaxes.
BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link
Guest: Andrew Gordon, ESQ.
Topic: FBAR & FATCA Filing for Crypto
Summary:
Our guest, Andrew Gordon, is a tax attorney who understands the ins and outs of foreign account reporting in relation to cryptocurrency trading. Andrew joins us to discuss FBAR & FATCA reporting, the penalties associated with not reporting, and to address whether he believes crypto traders should be filing these forms.
Andrew has been working in the crypto-space since 2014. [00:24]
Andrew: Actually several years ago, ago in 2014, we had a client approach us who was getting paid "magic internet money", from the Ethereum Foundation. Back then the IRS had not released any guidance - it wasn't till later in 2014 that the IRS even defined Crypto as property. That was our first introduction and we were and presented the question of, well, if I'm getting paid these random tokens called Ethereum, how do we account for this?
In terms of foreign account reporting, there's two main forms you need to know about: FBAR & FATCA. The FBAR is a separate form that is due the same day as your returns. [02:42]
Andrew: FBAR is my favorite four letter word. It stands for "Foreign Bank Account Report". It isn't actually filed with your tax return. It's a separate form. It's filed online, electronically. It has the same due dates as your tax returns - April 15th and it can be extended six months to October 15th. So same due dates, but it's filed differently, still sent to the Department of Treasury - it's a separate form.
On the FBAR form, what taxpayers have to do is they have to identify the maximum value at any time during the tax year of their foreign bank accounts. If that value at anytime exceeded $10,000, you have to report. The FBAR is an informational form, which means that there's no tax actually owed.
There are popular exchanges that ARE considered foreign entities and some that are NOT considered foreign entities.[04:15]
Andrew: Unfortunately, it's not that easy because a lot of exchanges don't even make their address public - it's pretty hard to find. Even just as a starting point, I would list out all of the exchanges that you've used and try to use Google to find their addresses.
There's a couple that we know are considered foreign financial institutions at this point, and the most popular is Binance. In addition, many people suspect that Bitfinex has kind of self-reported themselves as a foreign financial institution and their information is being shared with taxing authorities.
Coinbase, Gemini, GDAX, and a number of others are considered a US-based institution.
The FATCA form is 8938, and is part of your tax-return. [06:15]
Andrew: It's very similar to the FBAR, but it's not exactly the same. One of the first differences is that the threshold for FATCA is higher. For the FBAR, your aggregate maximum holdings have to exceed $10,000. Aggregate meaning that when you add your bank accounts or crypto exchanges together, the maximum during the year exceeds $10,000.
The FATCA threshold, for a single person, is $50,000. FATCA, just like the FBAR, is an informational form, which means again, there's no tax due. The government just wants to know the maximum value of each account. One of the other differences is that FATCA is more general, so FBAR only requires foreign bank accounts to be recorded, whereas FATCA is both bank accounts and foreign assets.
There's no tax involved with these forms - but there are significant penalties for not filing when required to do so. [07:57]
Andrew: The penalties for not filing an FBAR can be very severe. One of the most basic penalties for not filing an FBAR is $10,000 per year - for non-willful offenders.
If you were willful and you just disregarded your requirement to file? Well then the penalties can be even higher - up to 75% of the maximum value of your account or your exchange values. It can be very severe. So while there's no tax, the penalties are much greater. It's one of those things to do to comply with the rules.
The FATCA form also has similar penalties.
The burden of proof for "non-willfulness" is on you. [10:14]
Andrew: To be able to prove that you are not-willful is very difficult. In general, if you file and sign your tax returns, you are signing under penalties of perjury that everything is correct. You have an obligation to know the requirements and just saying "I didn't know the law" is not sufficient proof of non-willfulness.
If you've exceeded these limits in previous years, but didn't file these forms, there are still feasible options to consider…but these options may not last forever. [16:25]
Andrew: I would suggest that if you met these requirements in earlier years, take corrective action to amend or file the returns properly. There are some IRS programs that are available to come forward and file these forms for earlier years with a reduced penalty - or in some cases, no penalty at all.
The IRS Streamlined Offshore Disclosure Program. Under this program, you have to be non-willful and you will actually self-certify - so you'll sign a statement saying I didn't file the FBAR because I basically didn't know about it. There are some other requirements to be aware of as well. In this program, you'll pay a five percent penalty on the maximum balance of your foreign exchange value.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

BitcoinTaxes Podcast: FBAR & FATCA Filing for Crypto Traders

BitcoinTaxes Podcast Link
Guest: Andrew Gordon, ESQ.
Topic: FBAR & FATCA Filing for Crypto

Summary:
Our guest, Andrew Gordon, is a tax attorney who understands the ins and outs of foreign account reporting in relation to cryptocurrency trading. Andrew joins us to discuss FBAR & FATCA reporting, the penalties associated with not reporting, and to address whether he believes crypto traders should be filing these forms.
Andrew has been working in the crypto-space since 2014. [00:24]
Andrew: Actually several years ago, ago in 2014, we had a client approach us who was getting paid "magic internet money", from the Ethereum Foundation. Back then the IRS had not released any guidance - it wasn't till later in 2014 that the IRS even defined Crypto as property. That was our first introduction and we were and presented the question of, well, if I'm getting paid these random tokens called Ethereum, how do we account for this?
In terms of foreign account reporting, there's two main forms you need to know about: FBAR & FATCA. The FBAR is a separate form that is due the same day as your returns. [02:42]
Andrew: FBAR is my favorite four letter word. It stands for "Foreign Bank Account Report". It isn't actually filed with your tax return. It's a separate form. It's filed online, electronically. It has the same due dates as your tax returns - April 15th and it can be extended six months to October 15th. So same due dates, but it's filed differently, still sent to the Department of Treasury - it's a separate form.
On the FBAR form, what taxpayers have to do is they have to identify the maximum value at any time during the tax year of their foreign bank accounts. If that value at anytime exceeded $10,000, you have to report. The FBAR is an informational form, which means that there's no tax actually owed.
There are popular exchanges that ARE considered foreign entities and some that are NOT considered foreign entities.[04:15]
Andrew: Unfortunately, it's not that easy because a lot of exchanges don't even make their address public - it's pretty hard to find. Even just as a starting point, I would list out all of the exchanges that you've used and try to use Google to find their addresses.
There's a couple that we know are considered foreign financial institutions at this point, and the most popular is Binance. In addition, many people suspect that Bitfinex has kind of self-reported themselves as a foreign financial institution and their information is being shared with taxing authorities.
Coinbase, Gemini, GDAX, and a number of others are considered a US-based institution.
The FATCA form is 8938, and is part of your tax-return. [06:15]
Andrew: It's very similar to the FBAR, but it's not exactly the same. One of the first differences is that the threshold for FATCA is higher. For the FBAR, your aggregate maximum holdings have to exceed $10,000. Aggregate meaning that when you add your bank accounts or crypto exchanges together, the maximum during the year exceeds $10,000.
The FATCA threshold, for a single person, is $50,000. FATCA, just like the FBAR, is an informational form, which means again, there's no tax due. The government just wants to know the maximum value of each account. One of the other differences is that FATCA is more general, so FBAR only requires foreign bank accounts to be recorded, whereas FATCA is both bank accounts and foreign assets.
There's no tax involved with these forms - but there are significant penalties for not filing when required to do so. [07:57]
Andrew: The penalties for not filing an FBAR can be very severe. One of the most basic penalties for not filing an FBAR is $10,000 per year - for non-willful offenders.
If you were willful and you just disregarded your requirement to file? Well then the penalties can be even higher - up to 75% of the maximum value of your account or your exchange values. It can be very severe. So while there's no tax, the penalties are much greater. It's one of those things to do to comply with the rules.
The FATCA form also has similar penalties.
The burden of proof for "non-willfulness" is on you. [10:14]
Andrew: To be able to prove that you are not-willful is very difficult. In general, if you file and sign your tax returns, you are signing under penalties of perjury that everything is correct. You have an obligation to know the requirements and just saying "I didn't know the law" is not sufficient proof of non-willfulness.
If you've exceeded these limits in previous years, but didn't file these forms, there are still feasible options to consider…but these options may not last forever. [16:25]
Andrew: I would suggest that if you met these requirements in earlier years, take corrective action to amend or file the returns properly. There are some IRS programs that are available to come forward and file these forms for earlier years with a reduced penalty - or in some cases, no penalty at all.
The IRS Streamlined Offshore Disclosure Program. Under this program, you have to be non-willful and you will actually self-certify - so you'll sign a statement saying I didn't file the FBAR because I basically didn't know about it. There are some other requirements to be aware of as well. In this program, you'll pay a five percent penalty on the maximum balance of your foreign exchange value.
If you enjoyed our podcast, be sure to check back frequently for more great discussions about a range of topics in the crypto space. If you have any questions for Andrew Gordon, he can be reached via his website, Gordon Law LTD, or via Twitter @Accounting.
If you would like to request a topic for an interview, or have any questions related to this podcast, be sure to reach out to us at [email protected].
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to bitcointaxes [link] [comments]

Blockchain Wallets

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What a Blockchain Wallet is? What is its purpose?
Find the answer after reading this article.
Public/Private Key
The public key is the digital code you give to someone that wants to transfer ownership of a unit of cryptocurrency to you; and a private key is what you need to be able to unlock your own wallet to transfer a unit of a cryptocurrency to someone else. The encoding of information within a wallet is done by the private and public keys. That is the main component of the encryption that maintains the security of the wallet. Both keys function in simultaneous encryption systems called symmetric and asymmetric encryption. The former, alternatively known as private key encryption, makes use of the same key for encryption and decryption. The latter, asymmetric encryption, utilizes two keys, the public and private key, wherein a message-sender encrypts the message with the public key, and the recipient decodes it with their private key. The public key uses asymmetric algorithms that convert messages into an unreadable format. A person who possesses a public key can encrypt the message for a specific receiver.
Accessing wallets
Methods of wallet access vary depending on the type of wallet being used. Various types of currency wallets on an exchange will normally be accessed via the exchange’s entrance portal, normally involving a combination of a username/password and optionally, 2FA (Two factor authentication, which we explain in more detail later). Whereas hardware wallets need to be connected to an internet enabled device, and then have a pin code entered manually by the user in possession of the hardware wallet in order for access to be gained. Phone wallets are accessed through the device on which the wallet application has been downloaded. Ordinarily, a passcode and/or security pattern must be entered before entry is granted, in addition to 2FA for withdrawals.
Satoshi Nakamoto built the Satoshi client which evolved into Bitcoin in 2009. This software allowed users to create wallets and send money to other addresses. However, it proved to be a nightmarish user experience, with many transactions being sent to incorrect addresses and private keys being lost. The MtGox (Magic the Gathering Online exchange, named after the original intended use of the exchange) incident, which will be covered in greater detail later, serves as a reminder of the dangers present in the cryptosphere regarding security, and the need to constantly upgrade your defenses against all potential hacks. The resulting loss of 850k BTC is a still unresolved problem, weighing heavily on the victims and the markets at large. This caused a huge push for a constantly evolving and improving focus on security. Exchanges that developed later, and are thus considered more legitimate and secure, such as Gemini and Coinbase, put a much greater emphasis on vigilance as a direct result of the MtGox hacking incident. We also saw the evolution of wallet security into the physical realm with the creation of hardware wallets, most notable among them the Ledger and Trezor wallets.
Types of Wallets & Storage Methods
The simplest way to sift through the dozens of cryptocurrency storage methods available today, is to divide them up into digital and non-digital, software and hardware wallets. There are also less commonly used methods of storage of private keys, like paper wallets and brain wallets. We will examine them all at least briefly, because in the course of your interaction with cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology, it is essential to master all the different types of hardware and software wallets. Another distinction must be made between hot wallets and cold wallets. A hot wallet is one that is connected to the internet, and a cold wallet is one that is not. Fun fact: The level below cold storage, deep cold storage has just recently been implemented by the Regal RA DMCC, a subsidiary of an internationally renowned gold trading company licensed in the Middle East. After having been granted a crypto trading license, Regal RA launched their “deep cold” storage solution for traders and investors, which offers the ability to store crypto assets in vaults deep below the Almas Tower in Dubai. This storage method is so secure that at no point is the vault connected to a network or the internet; meaning the owners of the assets can be sure that the private keys are known only to the rightful owners.
Lets take a quick look at specific features and functionality of varieties of crypto wallets. Software wallets: wallet applications installed on a laptop, desktop, phone or tablet. Web Wallets: A hot wallet by definition. Web Wallets are accessible through the web browser on your phone or computer. The most important feature to recognize about any kind of web wallet, is that the private keys are held and managed by a trusted third party. MyEtherWallet is the most commonly used non-exchange web wallet, but it can only be used to store Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens.
Though the avenue of access to MEW is through the web, it is not strictly speaking a web wallet, though this label will suffice for the time being. The MEW site gives you the ability to create a new wallet so you can store your ETH yourself. All the data is created and stored on your CPU rather than their servers. This makes MEW a hybrid kind of web wallet and desktop wallet. Exchange Wallets: A form of Web Wallet contained within an exchange. An exchange will hold a wallet for each individual variety of cryptocurrency you hold on that exchange. Desktop Wallets: A software program downloaded onto your computer or tablet hard drive that usually holds only one kind of cryptocurrency. The Nano Wallet (Formerly Raiwallet) and Neon wallet for storage of NEO and NEP-5 tokens are notable examples of desktop wallets Phone Wallets: These are apps downloaded onto a mobile phone that function in the same manner as a desktop wallet, but actually can hold many different kinds of cryptocurrency. The Eidoo Wallet for storing Ethereum and its associated tokens and Blockchain Wallet which currently is configured to hold BTC, ETH and Bitcoin Cash, are some of the most widely used examples.
Hardware wallets — LedgeTrezoAlternatives
Hardware wallets are basically physical pathways and keys to the unique location of your crypto assets on the Blockchain. These are thought to be more secure than any variety of web wallet because the private key is stored within your own hard wallet, an actual physical device. This forcibly removes the risk your online wallet, or your exchange counter party, might be hacked in the same manner as MtGox. In hardware wallet transactions, the wallet’s API creates the transaction when a user requests a payment. An API is a set of functions that facilitates the creation of applications that interact and access features or data of an operating system. The hardware then signs the transaction, and produces a public key, which is given to the network. This means the signing keys never leave the hardware wallet. The user must both enter a personal identification number and physically press buttons on the hardware wallet in order to gain access to their Blockchain wallet address through this method, and do the same to initiate transfers.
Paper Wallets
Possibly the safest form of cryptocurrency storage in terms of avoiding hacking, Paper Wallets are an offline form of crypto storage that is free to set up, and probably the most secure way for users, from beginners to experts, to hold on to their crypto assets. To say it simply, paper wallets are an offline cold storage method of storing cryptocurrency. This includes actually printing out your public and private keys on a piece of paper, which you then store and save in a secure place. The keys are printed in the form of QR codes which you can scan in the future for all your transactions. The reason why it is so safe is that it gives complete control to you, the user. You do not need to worry about the security or condition of a piece of hardware, nor do you have to worry about hackers on the net, or any other piece of malware. You just need to take care of one piece of paper!
Real World Historical Examples of Different Wallet Types
Web Wallet: Blockchain.info Brief mechanism & Security Blockchain.info is both a cryptocurrency wallet, supporting Bitcoin, Ethereum and Bitcoin cash, and also a block explorer service. The wallet service provided by blockchain.info has both a Web Wallet, and mobile phone application wallet, both of which involve signing up with an email address, and both have downloadable private keys. Two Factor Authentication is enabled for transfers from the web and mobile wallets, as well as email confirmation (as with most withdrawals from exchanges). Phone Wallet: Eidoo The Eidoo wallet is a multi-currency mobile phone app wallet for storage of Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens. The security level is the standard phone wallet level of email registration, confirmation, password login, and 2 factor authentication used in all transfers out. You may find small volumes of different varieties of cryptocurrencies randomly turning up in your Eidoo wallet address. Certain projects have deals with individual wallets to allow for “airdrops” to take place of a particular token into the wallet, without the consent of the wallet holder. There is no need to be alarmed, and the security of the wallet is not in any way compromised by these airdrops.
Neon Wallet
The NEON wallet sets the standard for web wallets in terms of security and user-friendly functionality. This wallet is only designed for storing NEO, Gas, and NEP-5 tokens (Ontology, Deep Brain Chain, RPX etc.). As with all single-currency wallets, be forewarned, if you send the wrong cryptocurrency type to a wallet for which it is not designed, you will probably lose your tokens or coins. MyEtherWallet My Ether Wallet, often referred to as MEW, is the most widely used and highly regarded wallet for Ethereum and its related ERC-20 tokens. You can access your MEW account with a hardware wallet, or a different program. Or you can also get access by typing or copying in your private key. However, you should understand this method is the least safe way possible,and therefore is the most likely to result in a hack. Hardware: TrezoLedger Brief History Mechanism and Security A hardware wallet is a physical key to your on-chain wallet location, with the private keys contained within a secure sector of the device. Your private key never leaves your hardware wallet. This is one of the safest possible methods of access to your crypto assets. Many people feel like the hardware wallet strikes the right balance between security, peace of mind, and convenience. Paper Wallet Paper wallets can be generated at various websites, such as https://bitcoinpaperwallet.com/ and https://walletgenerator.net/. They enable wallet holders to store their private keys totally offline, in as secure a manner as is possible.
Real World Example — Poor Practices
MtGox Hack history effects and security considerations MtGox was the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world before it was hacked in 2014. They were handling over 70% of BTC transactions before they were forced to liquidate their business. The biggest theft of cryptocurrency in history began when the private keys for the hot wallets were stolen in 2011 from a wallet.dat file, possibly by hacking, possibly by a rogue employee. Over the course of the next 3 years the hot wallets were emptied of approximately 650000 BTC. The hacker only needed wallet.dat file to access and make transfers from the hot wallet, as wallet encryption was only in operation from the time of the Bitcoin 0.4.0 release on Sept 23rd 2011. Even as the wallets were being emptied, the employees at Mt Gox were apparently oblivious to what was taking place. It seems that Mt Gox workers were interpreting these withdrawals as large transfers being made to more secure wallets. The former CEO of the exchange, Mark Karpeles, is currently on trial for embezzlement and faces up to 5 years in prison if found guilty. The Mt Gox hack precipitated the acceleration of security improvements on other exchanges, for wallets, and the architecture of bitcoin itself. As a rule of thumb, no small-to-medium scale crypto holders should use exchange wallets as a long-term storage solution. Investors and experienced traders may do this to take advantage of market fluctuations, but exchange wallets are perhaps the most prone to hacking, and storing assets on exchanges for an extended time is one of the riskiest ways to hold your assets.
In a case strikingly similar to the MtGox of 2011–2014, the operators of the BitGrail exchange “discovered” that approximately 17 million XRB ($195 million worth in early 2018) were missing. The operators of the exchange were inexplicably still accepting deposits, long after they knew about the hack. Then they proceeded to block withdrawals from non-EU users. And then they even requested a hard fork of the code to restore the funds. This would have meant the entire XRB Blockchain would have had to accept all transactions from their first “invalid” transaction that were invalid, and rollback the ledger. The BitGrailexchange attempted to open operations in May 2018 but was immediately forced to close by order of the Italian courts. BitGrail did not institute mandatory KYC (Know your customer) procedures for their clients until after the theft had been reported, and allegedly months after the hack was visible. They also did not have 2 factor authentication mandatory for withdrawals. All big, and very costly mistakes.
Case Study: Good Practice Binance, the Attempted Hack
During the 2017 bull run, China-based exchange Binance quickly rose to the status of biggest altcoin exchange in the world, boasting daily volumes that surged to over $4 billion per day in late December. Unfortunately, this success attracted the attention of some crafty hackers. These hackers purchased domain names that were confusingly similar to “binance.com”. And then they created sufficiently convincing replica websites so they could phish traders for their login information. After obtaining this vital info, the scammers created API keys to place large buy orders for VIAcoin, an obscure, low volume digital currency. Those large buy orders spiked VIA’s price. Within minutes they traded the artificially high-priced VIA for BTC. Then they immediately made withdrawal requests from the hacked BTC wallets to wallets outside of the exchange. Almost a perfect fait accompli! But, Binance’s “automating risk management system” kicked in, as it should, and all withdrawals were temporarily suspended, resulting in a foiled hacking attempt.
Software Wallets Web/Desktop/Phone/Exchange Advantages and Limitations
As we said before, it is inadvisable to store crypto assets in exchange wallets, and, to a lesser extent, Web Wallets. The specific reason we say that is because you need to deliver your private keys into the hands of another party, and rely on that website or exchange to keep your private key, and thus your assets, safe. The advantages of the less-secure exchange or web wallets, are the speed at which you can transfer assets into another currency, or into another exchange for sale or for arbitrage purposes. Despite the convenience factor, all software wallets will at some point have been connected to the internet or a network. So, you can never be 100% sure that your system has not been infected with malware, or some kind of keylogging software, that will allow a third party to record your passwords or private keys. How well the type of storage method limits your contact with such hazards is a good way to rate the security of said variety of wallet. Of all the software wallets, desktop and mobile wallets are the most secure because you download and store your own private key, preferably on a different system. By taking the responsibility of private key storage you can be sure that only one person has possession of it, and that is you! Thereby greatly increasing the security of your crypto assets. By having their assets in a desktop wallet, traders can guard their private key and enjoy the associated heightened security levels, as well keep their assets just one swift transfer away from an exchange.
Hardware Wallets Advantages and Limitations
We briefly touched on the features and operation of the two most popular hardware wallets currently on the market, the Ledger and Trezor wallets. Now it will be helpful to take a closer look into the pros and cons of the hardware wallet storage method. With hardware wallets, the private keys are stored within a protected area of the microcontroller, and they are prevented from being exported out of the device in plain text. They are fortified with state-of-the-art cryptography that makes them immune to computer viruses and malware. And much of the time, the software is open source, which allows user validation of the entire performance of the device. The advantages of a hardware wallet over the perhaps more secure paper wallet method of crypto storage is the interactive user experience, and also the fact that the private key must at some stage be downloaded in order to use the paper wallet. The main disadvantage of a hardware wallet is the time-consuming extra steps needed to transfer funds out of this mode of storage to an exchange, which could conceivably result in some traders missing out on profits. But with security being the main concern of the vast majority of holders, investors and traders too, this slight drawback is largely inconsequential in most situations.
Paper Wallets Advantages and Limitations
Paper wallets are thought by some to be the safest way to store your crypto assets, or more specifically, the best method of guarding the pathways to your assets on the Blockchain. By printing out your private key information, the route to your assets on the Blockchain is stored 100% offline (apart from the act of printing the private key out, the entire process is totally offline). This means that you will not run the risk of being infected with malware or become the victim of keylogging scams. The main drawback of using paper wallets is that you are in effect putting all your eggs in one basket, and if the physical document is destroyed, you will lose access to your crypto assets forever.
Key things to keep in mind about your Wallet Security: Recovery Phrases/Private Key Storage/2FA/Email Security
Recovery phrases are used to recover the on-chain location for your wallet with your assets for hardware wallets like ledgers and Trezors that have been lost. When you purchase a new ledger for example, you just have to set it up again by entering the recovery phrase into the display and the lost wallets will appear with your assets intact. Private key storage is of paramount importance to maintain the safety of your on-chain assets! This should be done in paper wallet form, or stored offline on a different computer, or USB device, from the one you would typically use to connect to the 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) sometimes known as “two step authentication”. This feature offers an extra security layer when withdrawing funds from cryptocurrency wallets. A specialized app, most commonly Google Authenticator, is synced up to the exchange to provide a constantly changing code. This code must be entered within a short time window to initiate transfers, or to log into an exchange, if it has also been enabled for that purpose.
You must always consider the level of fees, or the amount of Gas, that will be needed to carry out the transaction. In times of high network activity Gas prices can be quite high. In fact, in December 2017 network fees became so high that some Bitcoin transactions became absolutely unfeasible. But that was basically due to the anomalous network congestion caused by frantic trading of Bitcoin as it was skyrocketing in value. When copying wallet addresses, double check and triple check that they are correct. If you make a mistake and enter an incorrect address, it is most likely your funds will be irretrievably lost; you will never see those particular assets again. Also check that you haven’t input the address of another one of your wallets that is designed to hold a different variety of cryptocurrency. You would similarly run the very great risk of losing your funds forever. Or, at the very least, if you have sent the wrong crypto to a large exchange wallet, for example on Coinbase, maybe you could eventually get those funds back, but it would still entail a long and unenjoyable wait.
How to Monitor Funds
There are two ways to monitor you funds and your wallets. The first is by searching for individual wallet addresses on websites specifically designed to let you view all the transactions on a particular Blockchain. The other is to store a copy of your wallet contents on an application that tracks the prices of all cryptocurrencies. Blockchain.info is the block explorer for Bitcoin, and it allows you to track all wallet movements so you can view your holdings and all the historical transactions within the wallet. The Ethereum blockchain’s block explorer is called Ether scanner, and it functions in the same way. There is a rival to Ether scanner produced by the Jibrel Network, called JSearch which will be released soon. JSearch will aim to offer a more streamlined and faster search method for Ethereum blockchain transactions. There are many different kinds of block explorer for each individual crypto currency, including nanoexplorer.io for Nano (formerly Rai Blocks) and Neotracker for NEO. If you simply want to view the value of your portfolio, the Delta and Blockfolio apps allow you to easily do that. But they are not actually linked to your specific wallet address, they just show price movements and total value of the coins you want to monitor.
That’s not all! You can learn how to transfer and monitor the funds in and out of your wallet by clicking on the link.
To be continued!
UBAI.co
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I hope we're all having fun with garlicoin. I put together a small guide for anyone who is interested in getting into trading crypto in general.

(This guide will not help you set up a wallet or mining for garlicoin. You can find that information on the official Discord or the offical website listed in the sidebar on the right.)
There's a buttload of coins out there. Some of them were made for fun, like garlicoin, or are unlikely to see the development they need to provide a use for the coin. A lot more are already in use in various ways or look to have a promising future. There's really no obvious rallying point for new people getting into crypto. If you want to discover this world, most sincerely, you may want to start by lurking on /CryptoCurrency. There are a lot of new people dipping their toes in crypto right now, and many have the same questions. Seriously, lurking on /CryptoCurrency will do you a lot of good.
That said, if you want to trade crypto currencies, the steps toward making that possible are quite simple. There are, in short, four things you need to do (And the fourth is optional).
1. You need to get your hands on some crypto. Mining is really bloody slow for any coin that is already populaworth any meaningful amount of money, so you almost have to buy some crypto with 'real'/fiat money. There are a few exchanges that do accept normal money, but importantly the exchanges you want to spend most of your time on don't. In short, laws and regulations are a lot more stringent for exchanges that let you trade with normal money, so most exchanges don't. But as I said, a few do. The biggest exchange that takes normal money is Coinbase. I must disclose however that I have never used them. I used a competitor called Bitpanda. Using Bitpanda was a quick and painless experience for me, so I do recommend them, however the googles tell me that they charge 1.5% more in fees than Coinbase do, so I'll leave that choice up to you. What you want to do is pick an exchange, create an account, and then get verified. Regardless of the exchange you pick, you are pretty much going to have no choice but to show them your ID. The governments of the world get awfully interested in any company that accepts large amount of 'real' money in exchange for magical Internet buckaroos. Getting verified makes it a lot harder for you to hide your money for tax/divorce/inheritance purposes, so please don't go into this with the intention of trying to deceive your government. Once you are verified, you will be able to purchase your first coins (except garlicoin, the trebuchet of cryptos, which we'll all get to mine together). Now, you will find that there aren't a lot of options. Depending on the exchange, you are likely to be able to buy Litecoin, Ethereum, Bitcoin, and maybe one or two others. Bitcoin is the most famous, of course, but in preparation for step two, you may want to choose one of the other coins your exchange offers, since they have lower transaction/moving fees.
Lastly for this step, remember, you absolutely do not need to buy whole coins. You can buy a tenth of a coin if you want. Everyone in crypto thinks the market is going to continue to grow, but it could crash at some point and not recover for years, so... Don't invest money you can't afford to lose or lock up for a long time. And especially do not take out any loans. Jesus Christ, do not take out any loans.
2. Move your money to the main exchanges. You have some crypto! Woo! Unfortunately, the exchanges that accept normal money kinda suck for trading. The fees they charge are way higher than the fees on the main exchanges, and they only deal in a few different coins. So basically, they are only good for moving normal money into crypto and vice versa. So what you want to do now is you want to move the coin you bought to one of the main exchanges. The most popular one bar none for crypto/crypto trading is Binance. Binance has had to close the registration of new accounts for a while recently, but as of a few days ago registrations are back up. There are a lot of competitors to Binance. The one that grew the most during Binance's registration closure was Kucoin. There are dozens of others, but they tend to have much lower trade volumes. It's entirely up to you where you go, but these two may be a good starting point. Binance is the largest and has the most trade, and many coins to choose between, while kucoin has some promising looking small coins that are not yet on Binance. Among the smaller other exchanges you will find dozens and hundreds of even smaller and more unknown coins, but many of these may be actual shit coins that will slowly fade away and die, and any money invested in them will just be lost. Of course, no doubt there are many nuggets of gold out there too. So whichever exchange(s) you go with, and whichever coins you decide to trade for, do some research first. This goes ten times over on the smaller exchanges, but is important even on Binance and Kucoin. Whichever exchange(s) you go with, go your funds/asset page, find the deposit wallet address for the coin you have and withdraw from your first exchange and send to that address. Do not send to the wrong address. Do not send Bitcoin (BTC) to an Ethereum (ETH) address. If you do, that money is lost forever. Yes, really.
3. Trade. There are two main ways of trading crypto, and most of us do a little bit of both and fall somewhere on the spectrum in between. These two are hodl and daytrading. Daytrading is the same as in stocks. All coins tend to go up and down a bit every day. Back and forth. So if you are lucky or patient enough, chances are you could for example buy a coin at $2 apiece, then sell them for $2.1, then buy again at $2... Of course, this is basically gambling, and the coin you bought at $2 could go down to $1.5. But if you put some effort in you can usually come out ahead. The other way is to 'hodl', which is just a meme name for picking a promising coin and hold on to it come hell or high water, because you think that in the long run it's going to increase greatly in value. Holding on to a favoured coin is often the smartest thing to do, because if the coin really has value, sooner or later more and more people will think so too and the price will rise. Ethereum for example is worth about $1000 per coin now, but it started out trading for under a dollar. It's important to remember that ultimately, the price of a coin is 'supposed' to reflect how useful it is. Every coin has some function it is supposed to fill, whether that be the increased privacy offered by privacy coins or enabling other coins to act through them, or competing with ads for website revenue generation or what have you. A lot of people are in crypto to make money speculating, but the foundation upon which all of that rests is the belief that most of these coins have actual, real world applications, either now or on the horizon. You forget this at your peril. /CryptoCurrency has plenty of discussions about the different coins out there, and just about every coin has its own dedicated subreddit where everyone on it is convinced that their coin has a bright future. A lot of them are right, too. But it's important to remember that the people on those subs are self selected for believing in the coin, and it's always a good idea to try to understand why others don't love the coin. Ultimately the best way to determine whether a coin has good potential is to 1. read the white paper (Most people don't, but they really should...), and 2. look up the team behind the coin (Most people don't, but they really should...). The shortcut is to just absorb the general mood on the various crypto subs and other crypto communities, but if you rely entirely on that you'll be surprised every time the community in general is surprised. Knowledge is a very important edge, whether you want to daytrade or hodl, and it's a tool a lot of people don't have. On the other hand, the mere fact that a lot of people believe in a coin is often enough to (temporarily) raise its price even if the coin is ultimately doomed to fail. So ride that wave if you wish, but at that point you're pretty much just gambling. Odds on the crypto market are better than at casinos, but even so. Be careful. And if you enjoy yourself, do take the time to get to know some of the coins. Really, it's fun and interesting and can save/make you a lot of money. Even if you're just in it for money, it's still the smart thing to do.
4. Decide where you want to keep your coins. You have two choices. You can keep your money on exchanges, or you can withdraw your coins and store them in a wallet. Personally I don't have all that much money, and I am content to have it spread out on a few different exchanges. However, a lot of of people are not comfortable leaving their coins on exchanges, because if it is hacked or goes under those coins are easily lost. This is unlikely to happen, especially on the bigger exchanges, but there is no doubt that getting your own wallet is safer. Different coins require different wallets, but a little bit of googling and double checking crypto forums can easily find a wallet that will work for your coin. The only downsides to keeping coins in your own wallet is that there is a (usually small) fee to withdraw coins from exchanges, and if you later want to trade your coin for something else it'll take a while to transfer it back to an exchange.
...And that's it, really. I will list a little bit of advice below, but this is all you 'need' to know to get started.
  1. Be really, really, really sure that you use the right addresses when you send coins. Sending Bitcoin (BTC) to an Ethereum (ETH) address will result in you losing that money forever. There is no bank to call up and do a charge back. The exchanges can't help you. Nobody can undo your mistake if you send money into the void. So make damn sure you are sending your coins to the right address.
  2. There are real scams out there. We are still in the early days of crypto, and it's pretty lawless much of the time. If someone is explaining to you how to send your coins around, and then give you an address to send to, that's not your address. That's theirs. And if you send them your money, it becomes theirs now, and good luck finding a random stranger on the Internet to press charges against. There are also coins that are never going to amount to anything, and if someone convinces you to buy one, that money is gone. There are scams out there. Before you do anything with your money, check around a bit and try find out if a lot of people think there's a scam involved. Sometimes it isn't entirely clear whether something is a scam or not, but in general you want to err on the side of caution. A good example of this is Bitconnect, a company that offers you easy money if you invest your crypto with them. It's not 100 percent clear that they are defrauding people, because all they are doing is offering really, really good interest rates and growing their user base, but their interest rates are so good that almost everyone in crypto is confident that sooner or later they will be unable to pay those interest rates, either because they run out of new customers with whose money to pay the interest for older customers, or because the crypto market will grow too slowly to sustain their growth no matter how large their customer base grows.
  3. No, seriously, don't invest money you can't afford to lose. We are in the wild west here, and a market down turn or a scam can end up costing you a good chunk or even all of the money you put in. By all means spread your money out between multiple coins on multiple exchanges/wallets, but even then, it is very possible that you will end up losing money. Crypto in general has been going up, up and up, but even so there are plenty of coins that have gone up, down, up, and then down down down. Oyster Pearl is a coin I thought looked really promising, and I still think it is, but in the last few weeks it's taken me from 60 cents per coin to four dollars and back down under 2. That's a net increase, but I assure you, it hurt when it fell by half. It hurt a lot. And some people bought in at $4 and lost half their investment in a few days.
That's the end of the guide. If you found this guide helpful, I would really appreciate if you used my referral links when signing up for exchanges. There is no downside for you in doing so, but the exchanges (pretty much all of them) give a small bonus if people sign up with your referral codes. So while I'm including my referral codes, the sites are the ones I use myself, and the ones I genuinely think are the best around. As I said above, I have not used Coinbase. If you wish to use Bitpanda for your initial coin purchase my link is here. For the main exchanges, my Binance link is here, and my Kucoin link is here. Alternatively you can find these sites on google. My Binance referral code is 11598073, and my Kucoin code is 1wHub. You can of course sign up for all these sites without using my referral codes, but if you found this guide helpful I would be grateful if you used them.
...Anyway. That is largely it. That's my guide for getting started in crypto. I can't stress enough that you'll want to take it slow. If $100 is a lot of money for you, start with $10, trade a little, get the hang of it. There's no substitute for personal experience. If you want to invest more, it's even more important that you take it slowly.
...Sorry for the long post, but I wanted to be thorough. Best of luck. Welcome to crypto trading!
I'm happy to answer questions. I'm by no means among the most knowledgeable about crypto on reddit, but I'm enthusiastic, and I should know enough to be able to answer most questions a complete beginner may have.
submitted by Rhamni to garlicoin [link] [comments]

From Ge You-esque Slouching to Blockchain Decentralization

These days, all my friends are very anxious. I heard that they stay up till 3am working on the blockchain, sending ICOs, talking about things like “if it rises or falls within the range of 50%, it’s called a stable sideways move”, and “the profit rate will at least be 100 times”. They also talk about the next-generation Internet, the greatest technology revolution since the Industrial Revolution. So, how does this decentralized blockchain influence our life?
Before we talk about the challenge of decentralization, we have to figure out why the challenge of decentralization exists.
Things after a long period of division, tend to unite; after a long period of union, tend to divide.
It is believed in China that “domains under heaven, after a long period of division, tend to unite; after a long period of union, tend to divide.” This rule applies not only to history, but also to the development of the Internet industry.
In the past, the Internet was only used to make phone calls and was monopolized by one or two large companies. This was because of the circuit switching technology back then. If we look back to even earlier age, we’ll find that people had to use manual wiring. Such low level of technology determines that the network at that time can only be centralized.
But the improvement of technology always leads to the new round of decentralization. The invention of the TCP/IP protocol gave an impetus to the arrival of the Internet era. As packet switching took the place of circuit switching, information could get around freely. Under such circumstances, it was simply impossible for one single company to monopolize the the resources of the entire network. It brought us the era of decentralization. Many portal sites and personal blogs came into being, and everyday there were newborn projects plunging into the great tide of the times.
This state of decentralization lasted for a while, then new problems appeared — information was difficult to search
Driven by this demand, search engines and super APPs became the new centers of the whole system. However, based on the data and portals that they had, these apps could collect more data. This is how centralization got to the era of cloud computing and big data.
Just as the time when TCP/IP made the world decentralized. Today, the new technology of blockchain has once again led the world to an era when centralization gives its way to decentralization.
Blockchain, Value Network and Consensus
Many years ago, I had thought, “Why can’t I just put my money into a file folder, in which each file represents a certain value, and when I send someone else a file, I simply transfer my money to him?” It is a pity that this idea could not be achieved by traditional Internet. The traditional Internet is a net of information and can only transmit the copies of those information. However, value, is not easy to transmit. But the birth of blockchain has totally changed the game and made it possible for value to be transferred, just as information is transmitted. This is the magic and charm of blockchain.
Transactions on the blockchain can only be generated by the user’s private key, and once they are recorded by the blockchain, they are impossibly to be changed. Based on the consensus of certain mathematical principles, people can trade with everyone without trusting them. Where there is consensus, there is possibility of cooperation.
All the wars and tragedies in human history are nothing but the result of the failed consensus. After the financial tsunami in 2008, almost at the same time, two people thought of a solution to all trust problems in the world.
l A Chinese and a Japanese
l Ge You and his invention, the conflict resolution terminal
l Satoshi Nakamoto and his invention, blockchain
I have explained to others what blockchain is for a million times —
  1. It’s a distributive ledger.
  2. It’s a decentralized application.
  3. It’s a consensus platform.
  4. It’s cryptocurrency
  5. It’s token economy.
I was totally enjoying my explanation, and the listeners were always like “What on earth are you talking about? Can you stop speaking Greek?”
Let’s watch an interesting video first. it’s called “Ge You and his conflict resolution terminal”. After that I’ll explain what blockchain actually is.
URL: https://v.qq.com/x/page/e133670fxux.html
Ge You is a famous Chinese comedian actor, and I mention him here just for fun. In this movie, his conflict resolution terminal only has two nodes, and simply by this, he defrauds another man to bankruptcy. We can just give it a laugh.
We can understand blockchain in this way: it is a conflict resolution terminal that countless people can participate at the same time. It can seal all the transaction contracts collectively, and no sealed participants can withdraw their transactions. One particular feature about the seal is that it’s a very complex paging seal, so that no one can change the data in it.
Using his knowledge in cryptography and POW algorithm, Nakamoto really implemented such a conflict resolution terminal. The world’s top scientists and mathematicians have verified the solidity of this theory, and after nearly ten years of running tests, nothing wrong has ever happened. And its value has increased by millions of times.
Well, I also admire Mr.Ge and his efforts for world peace.
The challenge brought by decentralization
OK I’ll skip the chitchat and go back today’s theme, the challenge of decentralization.
The challenge of technology development
Change is the only constant in life. Technology is updated and renewed everyday, and so is the technology of decentralization.
Because of its trustworthiness by nature, many systems that requires an intermediary to increase credibility are strongly impacted, such as banks, insurance industry, and lottery industry. Beside that, due to decentralization and anonymity, decentralization will impact existing industry rules in many gray dark-web trades or in the field where the law is lagging.
From the perspective of security, any problems caused by the high centralization can have great social consequences.These days, Facebook is facing a 2-trillion-dollar fine for its data breach, which is a wake-up call for everyone. As for China, let’s just imagine how our life will be impacted if Tencent or Alibaba or any other Internet industry giants go wrong.
With the commercialization of 5G technology and the explosive growth of IOT devices, the Internet traffic has shown an exponential increase. The asynchronous growth of the terminal devices and the server is a bottleneck that all centralized processing systems will eventually face.
The challenge of awareness.
We can catch up when our technology is left behind, but we will forever be stuck in the past if our mind is left behind.
Many of us have a belief that the society in which we are living, was, should be, and always will be what it is now. It’s not true.
The money you are using is not actually your own money.
The money we use today has not always been the same. In fact, it is only a few decades old. Before the Bretton Woods system collapsed, it required equivalent value of gold as the credit guarantee to issue currency. And nowadays, we always see news like the following:
1)The U.S. national debt has exceeded 20 trillion U.S dollars. 2)Xiong’an New Area received 100 billion yuan of credit. 3)China Merchants Bank grants 4 billion yuan of credit to Anbang Insurance Group
4)Anbang Insurance Group granted 10 billion yuan of credit to Guangyuan
If you can understand that national debt and credit are the same as direct currency printing, you can understand that the money you use is actually not your own money.
Blockchain is a bubble. So is the very essence of currency itself.
The reason why the release of TOKEN is so popular is that people for the first time actually realize that the essence of currency is credit. Credit, however can be created by media packaging and celebrity platform. And TOKEN is human’s first try to issue currency by blockchain. In the past, it took real guts to do such things. People who can understand it, will be zealous for it. People who don’t, call it fraud.
Companies, have not always been like their current form. Actually, in the future, they might even disappear.
Economic rules tell us that the transaction cost is the reason why company exists. A company will eventually grow to a state in which the company’s transaction costs and management costs are in balance. After that, the expansion of the company will lead to the increase in management costs. However, in the future blockchain world, the transaction of costs will inevitably converge to zero. Can companies still find their reasons to exist at that time? It’s not a long time since the first company came into being. So I would like to say that, the demise of the form of companies will not be far in the future.
In terms of market value, bitcoin market value is over $190 billion, exceeding Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley, as well as Boeing.
In terms of trading volume, some bitcoin companies such as Binance, OKEX and Huobi have almost reached the scale of the China A shares.
And here comes DAO, Distributed Autonomous Organization. In the future, more and more companies will be community-oriented on the base of blockchain. Also, there will be more start-up companies choosing to finance by blockchain and operate as a community directly.
Different people will have different feelings and understandings even when watching the same TV series. I watched a Chinese TV series called “Nothing Gold Can Stay”. It led me to think that, in the era of emerging capitalism, how greatly the traditional family business was impacted by the new production relations of the companies. The protagonist Zhou Ying, richest women in her province, failed not because she did not do well, but because the backward production methods dragged her down to the inevitable tragedy. Similarly, in the future, it’s not because that you are not good enough, nor your company is not good enough, but because more and more companies change their patterns and choose a decentralized and community-based mode.
Challenge of the society
The law always lags. Code is the (new) law.
The laws in almost in every country stipulate that users’ data on the Internet only belongs to the users themselves. Companies like Huawei and WeChat also claim that the data belongs to the users. But they know clearly that the data belongs to whoever has access to it.
Facebook, as well, claims that they will protect the user’s data. However, things turns out that they sell the data to whoever pay them.
All software has user authorization and agreement terms, but who will actually read it? What’s the point of reading? Since the law is merely a useless ceremony thing.
There are hundreds of laws about company governance and financing, but how does it do with decentralized communities?
The law stipulates that whoever commits a fraud over a certain amount of money will be put into jail. But in reality, there are people who just defraud billions of dollars by using the blockchain, and the law can do nothing about it.
The country is also a form of relation of production
Chinese students have learned about the relations of production since primary school. I’m not very good at it, so I won’t dig too deep.
Today, we are living in a centralized society, working in a centralized company, getting paid with the temporary coinage issued by the centralized system and imagining the challenges that decentralization will bring to our lives. Of course, our biggest goal is to make a better and fairer society by blockchain, where everyone will have more new opportunities.
In the end, I’d like to end up my speaking with a song. It’s called “ Song of Blockchain”. Hope you enjoy it.
— — — — — — — — End — — — — — — — — —
Guoping Liu
Blockchain technology and applications expert, one of Bitcoin’s first miners, founding developer of the Hero mobile cross-platform framework, president of the Hero Council. Formerly @ Wind, The9, and Dianrong, where he was heavily involved in the development of Dianrong’s blockchain applications.
Previously spent many years developing the Hero framework and blockchain applications. In 2017, meshed the two together to create Hero Node, aimed at making distributed applications easy to develop for everyone. Staunch believer in a better future with distributed applications.
In an open world, Hero Node welcomes any and all feedback. Especially helpful feedback will be rewarded!
Talk to us: Email: [email protected] Twitter: Hero Node
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It promised to be ‘magic internet money’, and promised to do to value what the internet did to content and services. Bitcoin is indeed a fast and easy way to transfer value, soaring untethered over boundaries of nation states and regulations, and the frictions imposed by rent seekers such as banks and other financial institutions. However ... Introducing, Magic Internet Money: A Book About Bitcoin. This timely tale from Canadian author Jesse Berger is packed with striking imagery and descriptions, highlighting how Bitcoin is upending everything we thought we knew about money, and drawing attention to issues plaguing our current monetary system. Formatted as... Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao has apologized for causing concern among the crypto community when he openly spoke about the possibility of a rollback for the Bitcoin blockchain following confirmation of a hack leading to the theft of USD 40 million worth of bitcoins on its platform.. The rollback had caused a sharp backlash, particularly among Bitcoin-only communities, aghast at the very concept ... Bitcoin is no longer the magic internet money that it’s long been branded. But by being less, it could actually be much more. Meanwhile, who appeared in documentaries Magic Money and Bitcoin – Beyond the Bubble, maintained his excitement about Lightning Network’s potential for Bitcoin: “It would allow Bitcoin to be spent instantly, privately and cheaply at sub-penny scales. The implication of this are enormous for mass adoption. It will also mean that all other ... BTC back to $8000 & Altcoins Up MIM Daily 24 - June 6th, 2019 - BTC Price: $8,000 Don’t forget to check out the latest episode of Magic Internet Money podcast: BTC back to $8K, #DropG… Digital money that’s instant, private, and free from bank fees. Download our official wallet app and start using Bitcoin today. Read news, start mining, and buy BTC or BCH. Bitcoin Is Changing How People Save Money. Its Digital Gold For The Internet Generation. Learn How You Can Get Involved; Buying, Earning, Storing & Growing Your Bitcoin Safely. With Binance looking to legally establish a presence in the US crypto exchange market share, I imagine when it comes time for Libra to begin trading on exchanges Binance and Coinbase would be the first suitable options. I also believe that any coin competing with bitcoin on “fast, free, reliable” transactions are going to have their lunch eaten by Facebook. XRP, BCH, LTC, DASH, etc should ... Binance’s CEO has confirmed that the crypto exchange is working on its own mining pool to mine Bitcoins. On Tuesday morning rumors appeared that about the exchange’s plan to create a new pool ...

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This Line Is Critical For Bitcoin + Binance Scandal

* How to earn money from internet * How to earn money from online * How to earn money from home * Real ways to make money from home * Cryptocurrency * Bitcoin * Free Bitcoin * Dogecoin * ETH, XRP ... Hidden Secrets Of Money - Mike Maloney S1 • E8 From Bitcoin To Hedera Hashgraph (Documentary) Hidden Secrets Of Money Episode 8 - Duration: 1:14:26. GoldSilver (w/ Mike Maloney) 1,001,919 views ... Exploring the revolutionary Bitcoin digital currency. It doesn't need banks or to be printed. It can be transferred in a second to anywhere in the world. With g... This information is what was found publicly on the internet. This information could’ve been doctored or misrepresented by the internet. All information is meant for public awareness and is ... In meinen Videos geht es um Bitcoin, Ethereum, Blockchain und Kryptowährungen generell, um Scam, Abzocke und Betrug besonders im Mining keinen Platz zu geben. Ich spreche darüber, wie du schlau ... New money coming into crypto! This is how bitcoin's bottom is formed! Binance delisting popular coins! Fed prints $60m USD per minute! Huge bank to store crypto! ETH ALGO BAX FTM NEWS For Business ...

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